Thomas Helleday

Professor

Thomas Helleday is Swedish and obtained his first degree in molecular biology at the Stockholm University (1995). Alongside these studies, he took a degree in Business Administration and Economics at the same university (1996). In 1999, he was awarded a PhD from Stockholm University for his studies on homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

After a short post-doctoral research period with Mark Meuth at the Institute for Cancer Research, Sheffield, UK, he obtained a lectureship at the same institute and set up his own group, with an interest in homologous recombination at replication forks in mammalian cells. At the same time, he maintained grants and a position at the Stockholm University, allowing his group to continue research at the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology. Thomas Helleday became professor at both University of Sheffield and Stockholm University in 2006, prior to be recruited as MRC Professor of Cancer Therapeutics at the Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology at the University of Oxford,. Currently, Thomas Helleday is the Torsten and Ragnar Söderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Science for Life Laboratory, Department of Oncology and Pathology, at the Karolinska Institutet Science Park in Stockholm. He has won numerous prestigious prizes including the ERC Advanced Grant Award twice 2010 and 2016, Cancer researcher of the year 2016 by the Swedish Cancer SocietyErik K Fernström Prize in Medicine 2014, Göran Gustafsson Prize in Medicine 2013, Skandia’s Lennart Levi Prize at Karolinska Institutet 2012. In the summer of 2018 he simultaneously has joined the Sheffield University at the Department Of Oncology and Metabolism for the establishment of a new cancer research institute. The current focus in the Helleday laboratories is understanding and exploiting altered nucleotide metabolism and DNA repair at replication forks for novel anti-cancer and inflammation therapies.

Awards and Prices: Carcinogenesis Young Investigator Award 2010, the Swiss Bridge Award 2008 by Swiss Cancer League and the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Svedberg Award 2008 by SFBM and Swedish National Committee for Molecular Biosciences, the European Association for Cancer Research Young Cancer Researchers Award 2007, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ Hilda and Alfred Eriksson’s prize 2007 for an outstanding research contribution in relief of diseases in man or animal, British Association for Cancer Research (BACR) – AstraZeneca Young Scientist Frank Rose Award 2006, the Eppendorf-Nature Young European Investigator Award 2005 for outstanding contribution within the field of biomedical science and the European Environmental Mutagen Society (EEMS) Young Scientist Award 2005.


Thomas Helleday

Professor

 

Resume

Thomas Helleday is Swedish and obtained his first degree in molecular biology at the Stockholm University (1995). Alongside these studies, he took a degree in Business Administration and Economics at the same university (1996). In 1999, he was awarded a PhD from Stockholm University for his studies on homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

After a short post-doctoral research period with Mark Meuth at the Institute for Cancer Research, Sheffield, UK, he obtained a lectureship at the same institute and set up his own group, with an interest in homologous recombination at replication forks in mammalian cells. At the same time, he maintained grants and a position at the Stockholm University, allowing his group to continue research at the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology. Thomas Helleday held two professorships; one as MRC Professor of Cancer Therapeutics at the Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology at the University of Oxford,and the other as Professor of Molecular Genetics at the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology at Stockholm University.

Many DNA damaging anti-cancer drugs cause replication-associated DNA damage that kill cancer cells. This is an effective way of treating cancer, but the problem is that also normal cells are damaged. Our strategy is to exploit the high level of DNA damage in cancer cells and prevent the repair of these lesions. Using DNA repair inhibitors, we can selectively introduce toxic DNA damage to cancer cells.

Currently, Thomas Helleday is the Torsten and Ragnar Söderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Science for Life Laboratory at the Karolinska Institutet Science Park in Stockholm. Thomas Helleday heads Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet. He has won numerous prestigious prizes including the Carcinogenesis Young Investigator Award 2010, the Swiss Bridge Award 2008 by Swiss Cancer League and the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Svedberg Award 2008 by SFBM and Swedish National Committee for Molecular Biosciences, the European Association for Cancer Research Young Cancer Researchers Award 2007, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ Hilda and Alfred Eriksson’s prize 2007 for an outstanding research contribution in relief of diseases in man or animal, British Association for Cancer Research (BACR) – AstraZeneca Young Scientist Frank Rose Award 2006, the Eppendorf-Nature Young European Investigator Award 2005 for outstanding contribution within the field of biomedical science and the European Environmental Mutagen Society (EEMS) Young Scientist Award 2005. The current focus in the Helleday laboratories is understanding and exploiting DNA repair and DNA-damage signalling pathways at replication forks for novel anti-cancer therapies

Ulrika Warpman Berglund

Deputy Group Leader, Helleday Lab Karolinska Institutet

Ulrika Warpman Berglund is a Pharmacist and has a PhD in Pharmacology. After defending her PhD thesis, she was headhunted to Pharmacia in 1997, where she worked as a scientist, section head and project leader. In 2000 she joined Biovitrum as pharmacology group leader as well as project leader for drug discovery projects and was member of the Discovery research steering group. In 2009, Ulrika left Sweden to join Prosidion Ltd in Oxford, UK, where she successfully established a pharmacology department and was part of the Research steering group. Ulrika has successfully managed research projects leading to outlicensing of projects and developing of clinical candidates.

Ulrika joined Thomas Helleday’s lab at Karolinska Institute in 2012 and helped him to establish the translational team that exists today with the research focus on DNA repair. She has been responsible for successfully taking novel first-in-class MTH1 inhibitors from an idea into clinical phase 1 trials presently on-going at Karolinska University Hospital. She has been a co-applicant to a number of successful funding applications together with Professor Thomas Helleday, from VR, Svensk strategisk forskning, KAW, Vinnova, cancerfonden, barnacancerfonden, EU H2020.

Today, Ulrika is the deputy group leader of the Helleday team located in Sweden.


Thomas Helleday

Professor

 

Resume

Thomas Helleday is Swedish and obtained his first degree in molecular biology at the Stockholm University (1995). Alongside these studies, he took a degree in Business Administration and Economics at the same university (1996). In 1999, he was awarded a PhD from Stockholm University for his studies on homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

After a short post-doctoral research period with Mark Meuth at the Institute for Cancer Research, Sheffield, UK, he obtained a lectureship at the same institute and set up his own group, with an interest in homologous recombination at replication forks in mammalian cells. At the same time, he maintained grants and a position at the Stockholm University, allowing his group to continue research at the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology. Thomas Helleday held two professorships; one as MRC Professor of Cancer Therapeutics at the Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology and Biology at the University of Oxford,and the other as Professor of Molecular Genetics at the Department of Genetics, Microbiology and Toxicology at Stockholm University.

Many DNA damaging anti-cancer drugs cause replication-associated DNA damage that kill cancer cells. This is an effective way of treating cancer, but the problem is that also normal cells are damaged. Our strategy is to exploit the high level of DNA damage in cancer cells and prevent the repair of these lesions. Using DNA repair inhibitors, we can selectively introduce toxic DNA damage to cancer cells.

Currently, Thomas Helleday is the Torsten and Ragnar Söderberg Professor of Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology at Science for Life Laboratory at the Karolinska Institutet Science Park in Stockholm. Thomas Helleday heads Translational Medicine and Chemical Biology, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet. He has won numerous prestigious prizes including the Carcinogenesis Young Investigator Award 2010, the Swiss Bridge Award 2008 by Swiss Cancer League and the International Union Against Cancer (UICC), the Svedberg Award 2008 by SFBM and Swedish National Committee for Molecular Biosciences, the European Association for Cancer Research Young Cancer Researchers Award 2007, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences’ Hilda and Alfred Eriksson’s prize 2007 for an outstanding research contribution in relief of diseases in man or animal, British Association for Cancer Research (BACR) – AstraZeneca Young Scientist Frank Rose Award 2006, the Eppendorf-Nature Young European Investigator Award 2005 for outstanding contribution within the field of biomedical science and the European Environmental Mutagen Society (EEMS) Young Scientist Award 2005. The current focus in the Helleday laboratories is understanding and exploiting DNA repair and DNA-damage signalling pathways at replication forks for novel anti-cancer therapies

People working at Helleday Laboratory


Simin Zhang

Simin Zhang

Jemina Lehto

Jemina Lehto

Carlos Benitez-Buelga

Carlos Benitez-Buelga

Monica Pandey

Monica Pandey

Maurice Michel

Maurice Michel

Ulrika Warpman Berglund

Ulrika Warpman Berglund

Ann-Sofie Jemth

Ann-Sofie Jemth

Martin Scobie

Martin Scobie

Nina Gustafsson

Nina Gustafsson

Oliver Mortusewicz

Oliver Mortusewicz

Thomas Helleday

Thomas Helleday

Sean Rudd

Sean Rudd

Aleksandra Pettke

Aleksandra Pettke

Helge Gad

Helge Gad

Nadilly Bonagas

Nadilly Bonagas

Tobias Koolmeister

Tobias Koolmeister

Evert Homan

Evert Homan

Stella Karsten

Stella Karsten

Niklas Schultz

Niklas Schultz

Christina Kalderén

Christina Kalderén

Brent Page

Brent Page

Therese Pham

Therese Pham

Azita Rasti

Azita Rasti

Bishoy Hanna

Bishoy Hanna

Marjo Puumalainen

Marjo Puumalainen

Elisée Wiita

Elisée Wiita

Nick Valerie

Nick Valerie

Olga Loseva

Olga Loseva

Zhenjun Zhao

Zhenjun Zhao

Marianna Tampere

Marianna Tampere

Patrick Herr

Patrick Herr

Anna Huguet Ninou

Anna Huguet Ninou

Martin Henriksson

Martin Henriksson

Olov Wallner

Olov Wallner

Ingrid Almlöf

Ingrid Almlöf

Kumar Sanjiv

Kumar Sanjiv

Teresa Sandvall

Teresa Sandvall

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